Doug Macdougall J.D. MacDougall
Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything
May 02, 2020 Comments.. 655
Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything Doug Macdougall J.D. MacDougall Radioactivity is like a clock that never needs adjusting, writes Doug Macdougall It would be hard to design a reliable timekeeper In Nature s Clocks, Macdougall tells how scientists who were seeking to understand the past arrived at the ingenious techniques they now use to determine the age of objects and organisms By examining radiocarbon C 14 dating the bes Radioactivity is like a clock that never needs adjusting, writes Doug Macdougall It would be hard to design a reliable timekeeper In Nature s Clocks, Macdougall tells how scientists who were seeking to understand the past arrived at the ingenious techniques they now use to determine the age of objects and organisms By examining radiocarbon C 14 dating the best known of these methods and several other techniques that geologists use to decode the distant past, Macdougall unwraps the last century s advances, explaining how they reveal the age of our fossil ancestors such as Lucy, the timing of the dinosaurs extinction, and the precise ages of tiny mineral grains that date from the beginning of the earth s history In lively and accessible prose, he describes how the science of geochronology has developed and flourished Relating these advances through the stories of the scientists themselves James Hutton, William Smith, Arthur Holmes, Ernest Rutherford, Willard Libby, and Clair Patterson Macdougall shows how they used ingenuity and inspiration to construct one of modern science s most significant accomplishments a timescale for the earth s evolution and human prehistory.. Nature s Clocks How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything Radioactivity is like a clock that never needs adjusting writes Doug Macdougall It would be hard to design a reliable timekeeper In Nature s Clocks Macdougall tells how scientists who were seeking t
  • Title: Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything
  • Author: Doug Macdougall J.D. MacDougall
  • ISBN: 9780520249752
  • Page: 283
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything Doug Macdougall J.D. MacDougall

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      Published :2020-05-02T20:34:31+00:00

    1 Blog on “Nature’s Clocks: How Scientists Measure the Age of Almost Everything

    1. Jennifer says:

      Good layman s overview of radiometric dating Since my degree is in physics and in fact I did some independent research with a professor who was involved with the radiocarbon dating of The Shroud of Turin , the basic theory of radiometric dating is not new to me However, the history and detailed fieldwork behind actually dating anything particularly non C14 dating techniques was all new to me.However, I was disappointed that the scope did not go beyond radiometric dating, since that is the field [...]

    2. Daniel says:

      The philosopher of science Mario Bunge listed several criteria for distinguishing a science from non science Among the most important is the steady accretion of knowledge by a science Doug Macdougall s Nature s Clocks, a work of science history, describes the spectacular accretion of knowledge in geochronology Macdougall largely sidesteps the conflict between science, with its ability to integrate seemingly unrelated bits of evidence to open a stunningly precise and fruitful window into Earth s [...]

    3. Arvind Balasundaram says:

      In Nature s Clocks, author and scientist Doug Macdougall takes his readers through a spellbinding tour of the science and art of geochronology Tracing the roots of isotope chemistry to the accidental discovery of X rays by Roentgen, followed by the work on radioactivity by Marie Curie and Henri Becquerel, this book introduces readers to how the science of radioactive dating matured from the popularly recognized carbon 14 to elements like argon potassium and zircon, and the use of complex techno [...]

    4. Peter Tillman says:

      3.5 stars, nice book Read at Yavapai.

    5. Alan says:

      We ve all certainly read or heard of newspaper or magazine articles describing a new kind of fossil, maybe a dinosaur, and the article almost always includes a reference to the age of that fossil If you have ever wondered how scientists determine the ages of things then this is the book for you McDougall does a superb job of presenting and discussing the highly technical field of radiometric dating in a way that allows scientists and non scientists alike to enjoy the ride MacDougall hooked me in [...]

    6. Brett Stortroen says:

      Nature s Clocks covers in depth the history of how scientists discovered the technology of radiocarbon dating for biological carbon based life as well as the various radiometric dating for non organic matter The history of these great discoveries and the challenges overcome were quite compelling In addition, this book lays out the case for the dating techniques and equipment employed in a logical well ordered format The technical material was easy to follow and presented for the average layman t [...]

    7. Craig Jorgensen says:

      The oldest rocks are 4,567.2 million years old The frozen iceman found in the alps is 5,200 years old We know these timescales and the ages of almost everything in between with remarkable accuracy In my opinion this is an amazing accomplishment of modern science If you have even the slightest curiosity about how geologists, physicists, chemists, paleontologists and other scientists have figured this out then read this book Pretty well written and engaging coverage of this subject matter.

    8. Janie says:

      I gleaned fascinating inklings of chemistry and time keeping Well known, oft bandied scientific methods little s , little m that before were fuzzy magic to I now grasp with a basic understanding e.g carbon14 dating earthquake predictions.The writing is engaging Not too dry, not too sappy.

    9. Charles Ko says:

      It has a lot of historical backgrounds that are quite enjoyable to read The author is a geologist, so he has things to say about it from that perspective than, say nuclear physics It s probably okay for most readers Overall, easy and fun to read.

    10. Converse says:

      Focusing mainly on dating methods using radioactive decay, especially radiocarbon, uranium lead, and potasssium argon methods Explains calibration curve for radiocarbon Interesting applications of methods.

    11. Peter says:

      Though a little obtuse at times, Nature s Clocks is a very informative book on the different methods of dating the universe.

    12. James says:

      Really good book for understanding the principles of carbon dating, etc.

    13. Genti Mingla says:

      A very informative book.

    14. Mona says:

      241174 Hadar Ethiopia Who was Lucy, and why is she so important to human evolution How old was Lucy when she died Keen.I encourage you to read this book.

    15. Tod Landis says:

      Reading it now and really enjoying it.

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